The Difference Between Routine and Emergency Plumbing Services

There is a certain amount of dread and anxiety associated with discovering a leak in the basement at four in the morning. On a holiday. Or watching as the toilet water spins and spins but never seems to go down. Turning on a faucet or a shower and the lurching of pipes but yet no water springing forth. These are the inevitable and unenviable fears of any homeowner.

With statistics not on your side, it is only prudent to learn the role of emergency plumbing services and how they will shape your wallet and your house.

Emergency plumbing services literally covers any and all reasons why one would call a plumber at short notice and demand his expertise at one’s own residence. The second a plumber is making an emergency plumbing visit, he or she knows that there is potentially a great deal of money to be made. Plumbers never come at odd hours of the day or night, on holidays and weekends, to service a person’s house economically.

With that economic qualifier mentioned, it is also good to know that while emergency plumbing services are not cheap – they are sometimes absolutely necessary.

In the event of a catastrophic water or sewage leak, in which one risks the structure of one’s own home, emergency plumbing services are ideal. In these events, it’s best to simply call a 24 hour plumber or emergency plumbing service. Water and sewage leaks can not only damage the very wood structure and support of one’s own home, but potentially lead to mold and bacterial infiltration that puts the other occupants at health risks. Additionally, depending on which state or country in which the residence is located, there may be restrictions on whether or not the occupants may be allowed back into the house until the proper repairs and inspections are made.

There is also the dreaded septic system and leeching field issues. This class of plumbing problems is almost assuredly both an emergency and going to require industrial strength plumbing tools. Depending on where the residence is located, it may also require a HAZMAT certification or licensed professional to remove the sewage and waste. While this most assuredly CAN qualify for emergency plumbing, it may be possible, depending on the scope of the problem, to wait until normal contracted hours.

For a routine leaky faucet, running toilet, and a variety of ailments, it behooves the homeowner to wait until normal business hours and attempt to contract the plumber at a normal rate. This can save hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars in but a series of visits.

But just because it is during normal business hours DOES not mean that the plumber isn’t billing for an emergency visit. This is where it takes prudent and careful discussion BEFORE work begins, whereby the plumber clearly outlines the entirety of the work he or she intends to do, the cost of materials and labor, and the classification for the plumbing – routine repair, extensive repair, intensive repair, construction, and/or emergency plumbing.

Emergency plumbing can sometimes be the difference between losing a property to water and waste damage and recovering it. It can also be the difference between relatives complaining about not being able to use the bathroom and simply complaining about your pot roast. In the end, it truly is a homeowner’s decision whether or not to classify a plumbing project as emergency or otherwise.

Unfortunately, if a problem is underestimated in scope, it may turn into an emergency plumbing problem and may become a hindrance to all whom reside within. That is why it is a best practice to have both one’s regularly scheduled plumber and a back-up emergency plumbing service – in case routine turns into emergency.

What’s the Difference Between Service Dogs, Therapy Dogs, and Emotional Support Animals?

There is controversy surrounding the roles of animals in the lives of people with disabilities or chronic illnesses. Many of us have seen the posts online about registering your animal as an emotional support animal with a small fee, and being able to keep your animal in a no pets allowed setting. This has led people to question the legitimacy of all service animals and their roles. A feeling of distrust among people who do not understand the difference between these animals, and the rights that accompany them, has been emerging as more people utilize these services.

Service Dogs are the most protected and trained of the 3 types of dogs. While many people refer to all 3 types as “service animals”, the official names for this type is Service Dog. These dogs are legally considered medical equipment and have a price tag to match, ranging from $10,000- $50,000. They are intensively trained for 1.5-2.5 years, having to pass a variety of tests to be serviceable including, but not limited to, opening cupboards, retrieving dropped objects, staying calm in public, etc.

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, Service Dogs are allowed anywhere their handler is, and cannot be turned away from an establishment or refused to go to work with their handler. DOT’s Air Carrier Access Act, and DOJ/HUD Fair Housing Act and Federal Rehabilitation Act cover other circumstances that the ADA doesn’t. While there is a difference between Service Dogs and Emotional Support Animals, there is a gray area for dogs that are used to calm anxiety attacks under ADA rules. Psychiatric Service Dogs are covered under the ADA only if they perform a specific action to avoid or lessen an attack. If they are just there for comfort then they are considered an Emotional Support Animal.

Therapy dogs are kind of the opposite side of the same coin as Service Dogs. Instead of offering physical aid to their handlers, they provide psychological or physiological therapy to others and are accompanied by a handler who doesn’t usually need their service. The best example of a therapy dog would be dogs that go to children’s hospitals to bring comfort, or dogs that work in school systems.

These animals, like the Service Dogs, require extensive training. Therapy dogs are also encouraged to be very social and interact with a variety of people, unlike Service Dogs who need to focus on their handler. Therapy dogs may be trained by anyone, but they need to meet standards to be certified. Therapy dogs do not have the same rights as service dogs, though many places will allow a therapy dog to accompany their owners, they are not required to by law.

The last type we are discussing are Emotional Support Animals. This one is the most vague and open-ended. An Emotional Support Animal does not have to have any special training and most of the time is registered by its owner because it brings comfort. Also, an Emotional Support Animal does not have to be a dog. These animals are not protected under the ADA and cannot accompany their owners in establishments where there are no animals allowed. Owners with a registered support animals can keep them in housing that otherwise does not allow pets according to the Fair Housing Act.